Emergency Electrician - Hemel Hempstead

Emergency Electrician Hemel HempsteadCBM Electrical Contractors are a locally based company providing an emergency electrician service to Hemel Hempstead and the nearby town of Berkhamsted.

Our team of electrical engineers pride themselves on being 

  • Speedy - they understand that you want the problem resolved quickly!
  • Professional
  • Reliable
  • Courteous - they tidy up before they leave
  • Friendly

One of our team of emergency electricians are always on standby and are available to attend emergency call outs in the Hemel Hempstead area, any time, day or night, throughout the year. We look to have one of our electricians on site looking at your problem within 2 hours of your call. Our vans carry an extensive range of spares and equipment, with the aim of enabling them to deal with most potential issues in one visit.

Call us now on 01707 519056 so we can help you solve your electrical emergency!

A sample of questions we get asked a lot ...

  • PAT (Portable Appliance Testing) testing is a vital element of any businesses health & safety policy.
    Portable electrical appliances are responsible for around a quarter of all electrical related safety incidents. The Electricity at Work Regulations require  employers, employees and self-employed persons to abide by these regulations and take sensible and practical measures to ensure that using portable appliances does not create a danger. What this means in practice, is that anyone responsible for the regulations implements a thorough and repeated program of maintaining and inspecting portable equipment. The Health & Safety at Work Act (1974) introduced a legal obligation to carry out such testing as follows;

    • Where portable appliances are used by employees of the business
    • Where portable appliances are provided (e.g. hired out) to third parties
    • Where the members of the public may use such equipment in locations such as schools, hospitals, factories, shops etc.
    • Where portable appliances are fixed or mantained.

    The inspection regime, i.e. the level and frequency of inspections, should reflect the likelihood of the equipment becoming faulty, and should take into account the location where the appliance is being used and the way it is being used.

  • Alternating Current (AC) is where the flow of electrons in the current changes direction many times a second, oscillating  back and forth. Direct Current (DC) is where the flow of electrons occurs in only one direction. AC is the type of current most commonly used in households to power domestic electrical appliances whereas DC is most often used to power small portable devices and is the type of current produced by batteries.

  • A classification of equipment for which protection against electric shock is not solely reliant on basic insulation, but allows for the linking of exposed connective parts to a conducting mechanism in the fixed wiring of the installation. Class l equipment will have exposed metal parts an example being a washing machine

  • As with most trades and professions in the UK, electricians have to abide by certain standards and in the case of electricians the relevant standard is BS 7671 (alternatively known as the Institute of Electrical Engineering wiring regulations). This standard lays out minimum standards for the installation of electrical systems if they are to meet national safety standards. It is a condition of membership of NICEIC that all electricians meet this standard.

  • An aggregation of electrical equipment (electric sockets , lights and electric switches) supplied from the same point and protected against surges by the same protective device(s).

  • The electrical consumer unit (also referred to as the fusebox) is a distribution board consisting of a collection of circuits, alongside a manual mechanism for double pole isolation on the incoming current, plus fuses, RCDs or circuit breakers for automatic current breaking. As its name suggests, these devices are mainly to be found in a domestic setting.

  • As laid out in British Standard BS7671 any new electrical installation, or any changes to an existing circuit, including extending or re-purposing of an existing electrical circuit should result in the issuance of a certificate. The certificate will either be a standard electrical installation certificate or a minor electrical installation works certificate depending on the extent of the work carried out.

  • Electrical equipment such as music systems, television and DVD players, for which protection against electric shock is not solely reliant on basic insulation, but which include additional safety features such as extra insulation, there being no facility for the connection of exposed metal casings of the equipment to a conductor, and no dependence upon conductive precautions to be implemented in the fixed wiring of the installation of the equipment.

  • Firstly you need to ensure that the particular piece of electrical equipment is not live, i.e. any source of energy (i.e. usually electricity) has been fully isolated. You also need to ensure that the energy source cannot be accidentally restored before you have finished working on the device. Always ensure that you follow the manufacturers instructions on carrying out any maintenance procedures.

  • Class III equipment is equipment for which protection against electrocution is provided by Safety Extra Low Voltage (SELV) and in which there is no generation of voltages greater than SELV. The equipment must also be connected to an isolating transformer.  Medical equipment is an example of Class IIl.