Emergency Electrician - St Albans and Harpenden

Emergency Electrician St Albans and HarpendenFrom our base nearby we are able to provide an emergency electrician service covering St Albans and the close by town of Harpenden.

All of our electrical engineers are 

  • Professional
  • Reliable - they will be on site when they say they will
  • Courteous
  • Friendly

One of our team of electrical engineers are always on standby and are available to attend emergency call outs in the St Albans and Harpenden area, all day, every day, all year round. Within 2 hours of your call to us, we would expect to have one of our electricians on site, investigating and resolving your electrical problem. Our vans are well stocked with a full range of spares and equipment, giving them the ability to deal with most issues on a single visit.

Call us now on 01707 519056 so we can help you solve your electrical emergency!

A sample of questions we get asked a lot ...

  • Firstly you need to ensure that the particular piece of electrical equipment is not live, i.e. any source of energy (i.e. usually electricity) has been fully isolated. You also need to ensure that the energy source cannot be accidentally restored before you have finished working on the device. Always ensure that you follow the manufacturers instructions on carrying out any maintenance procedures.

  • As laid out in British Standard BS7671 any new electrical installation, or any changes to an existing circuit, including extending or re-purposing of an existing electrical circuit should result in the issuance of a certificate. The certificate will either be a standard electrical installation certificate or a minor electrical installation works certificate depending on the extent of the work carried out.

  • In order to determine if your domestic electrical installation work has been carried out properly and is safe, we would recommend that you arrange for an electrical contractor to carry out an inspection. Check that the electrician that you choose has been approved by one of the industry standards bodies such as the National Inspection Council for Electrical Instalation Contracting (NICEIC). 

  • Electrical equipment such as music systems, television and DVD players, for which protection against electric shock is not solely reliant on basic insulation, but which include additional safety features such as extra insulation, there being no facility for the connection of exposed metal casings of the equipment to a conductor, and no dependence upon conductive precautions to be implemented in the fixed wiring of the installation of the equipment.

  • An EICR is an Electrical Installation Condition Report, previously known as a PIR. This is a report whose purpose is to ascertain the state of the electrics in a building, clearly stating whether the electrics are in good condition and if not, what remedial work is required to bring the electrics to a satisfactory standard.

  • A Distribution Board is a collection of switches and/or current protective devices (such as circuit breakers, fuses etc) linked to one or several outgoing circuits, being fed by one or several incoming circuits, which includes terminals for neutral and aforementioned protective devices. The Distribution Board may also include controls for signalling. 

     

  • A classification of equipment for which protection against electric shock is not solely reliant on basic insulation, but allows for the linking of exposed connective parts to a conducting mechanism in the fixed wiring of the installation. Class l equipment will have exposed metal parts an example being a washing machine

  • An aggregation of electrical equipment (electric sockets , lights and electric switches) supplied from the same point and protected against surges by the same protective device(s).

  • The electrical consumer unit (also referred to as the fusebox) is a distribution board consisting of a collection of circuits, alongside a manual mechanism for double pole isolation on the incoming current, plus fuses, RCDs or circuit breakers for automatic current breaking. As its name suggests, these devices are mainly to be found in a domestic setting.

  • As with most trades and professions in the UK, electricians have to abide by certain standards and in the case of electricians the relevant standard is BS 7671 (alternatively known as the Institute of Electrical Engineering wiring regulations). This standard lays out minimum standards for the installation of electrical systems if they are to meet national safety standards. It is a condition of membership of NICEIC that all electricians meet this standard.